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What We Believe series

Publisher: Apologia Press
Author: John Hay and others
Review last updated: 2012
Instant KeyPublishers InfoPricingProduct Photos

What We Believe series

Three of a projected series of four books in the What We Believe series (Apologia Press) introduce the basic ideas and questions that help elementary grade children construct a biblical Christian worldview.

Who is God? And Can I Really Know Him? (2009), Who Am I? And What Am I Doing Here? (2010), and Who Is My Neighbor? (2011) are the first three books. Co-authored by John Hay and David Webb, these beautiful, hardcover books feature plenty of full-color illustrations. Children will want to see the pictures even if you use the books as read-alouds. The combination of stories, activity, and discussion makes what could be heady content more accessible and interesting to younger children.

The authors suggest using the books with children ages six through fourteen, although I think children beyond age twelve might find parts too young and younger children might find some of the vocabulary and concepts difficult to grasp. Nevertheless, I recommend trying to use these with the entire family, adapting as necessary to your children’s ages.

Two optional items are available as companions for each volume: a notebooking journal and a coloring book. The notebooking journals do not duplicate material in the core books. Instead they offer thought-provoking questions and space for students to write lengthy responses plus puzzles, drawing activities, vocabulary words with space to write definitions, and a few other activities. The journals are great tools for engaging older students, especially those in junior high. They might work independently in their journals while you have a discussion with younger children on concepts already familiar to your junior high student. Younger children might enjoy using the coloring books as you read aloud since the coloring pages correlate with the lessons.

Each lesson in the textbooks has a number of components. First, an introduction briefly reviews previous topics then presents the "big idea" of the upcoming lesson. Following is box listing lesson objectives. Many of the lessons feature fictional stories about children representing various worldviews. The stories are especially helpful for making the abstract worldview ideas more concrete for younger learners. Discussion questions following the stories help children grasp the ideas as well as implications for their own lives.

Children who can write should keep a notebook as they cover the lessons. Older students might maintain both a notebook and the notebooking journal. While older students might complete more work independently, I think the layout of the lessons lends itself best to family read-aloud and discussion for at least part of each lesson.

Each lesson’s vocabulary words and definitions should be recorded as well as two Bible verses students might memorize. Don’t forget to use the free, formatted, notebooking pages from the Apologia website; those pages include some with extended Bible learning activities as well.

About twice per lesson a box titled "Make a Note of It" provides a list of student questions, an extended Scripture reading with a reflection question, or something similar. These are not simple comprehension questions; they are thought provoking questions to which students should write responses in their notebooks. They are likely very challenging for children in the primary grades, so you should adapt and/or discuss them rather than using them as written assignments with young students.

Lessons also include a brief article that integrates other topics such as the arts, science, and history. For example, an article on the eruption of Mt. St. Helens helps children make sense of natural disasters in the context of a fallen world.

Some lessons include hands on activities such as creating a Mobius strip or making s'mores clusters to eat. Some of these relate directly to lesson concepts, while others seem only marginally connected.

"What Should I Do?" sections teach Godly character traits. Children learn appropriate responses, given what they have just learned about God and their relationship to Him. Prayers conclude the main part of each lesson.

Two final sections in the first volume develop deeper level worldview concepts and should help older children begin to develop some understanding and skill with apologetics. The final section in the first volume and selected lessons in the other volumes show a worldview model constructed like a building. (This model was created in partnership with Summit Ministries.) The model construction begins with the first book and is completed as you work through the other three books.

Who is God? And Can I Really Know Him? introduces foundational ideas about the existence of God, our ability to recognize truth, the nature of God, the Trinity, God as creator, the Fall, the purpose of our existence, our relationship to God, the problem of sin and separation from God, and the necessity of Jesus for salvation. Who Am I? And What Am I Doing Here? helps children understand what it means to be made in the image and likeness of God. They consider what this means in regard to decision making and the use of their personal gifts and talents. Along with stories of children from other cultures and religious beliefs, this volume features a series of stories about Brandon, a young page who will eventually become a knight with parallels between service to earthly kings and the King of Kings. Who is My Neighbor? helps children grasp the concept of servanthood. It teaches primarily through many stories of Christian service in both ordinary life and extraordinary situations. It challenges children to consider what they ought to do on all levels—from within their families out to the broader world stage. The fourth volume, What on Earth Can I Do?, is due out in 2013.

The six-page introduction in each book explains how to use it, although it does not fully describe the extensive, additional teaching material at the website. Apologia provides free, password-protected teaching resources on their website. While the extensive teaching material is helpful it is possible to work directly from the books without using the teaching material at all. However, the online teaching material is especially useful if you have younger children since it provides discussion questions appropriate for them. The webpages also include notebook pages and answer keys helpful for those with children about third grade and up, but the “Make a Note of It” sections in the books also offer age-appropriate assignments that can challenge older students.

The ideas presented in the What We Believe series are actually quite challenging even though they are presented in a way that younger students can begin to think about them. While younger children might find some ideas too abstract, they are likely to stay tuned in to the stories about children and some of the activities, and they are likely to pick up at least some of the concepts.

Pricing

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  • Who Am I? (And What Am I Doing Here?) -- Biblical Worldview of Self-Image (What We Believe, Volume 2)

    Who Am I? (And What Am I Doing Here?) -- Biblical Worldview of Self-Image (What We Believe, Volume 2)

    John Hay

    What on Earth Can I Do? -- Biblical Worldview of Stewardship (What We Believe, Volume 4)

    What on Earth Can I Do? -- Biblical Worldview of Stewardship (What We Believe, Volume 4)

    John Hay and David Webb

    Who Is God? Notebooking Journal (What We Believe)

    Who Is God? Notebooking Journal (What We Believe)

    David Webb

    Who Am I? Notebooking Journal (What We Believe)

    Who Am I? Notebooking Journal (What We Believe)

    David Webb

    Who Am I? And What Am I Doing Here? MP3 CD (What We Believe)

    Who Am I? And What Am I Doing Here? MP3 CD (What We Believe)

    John Hay

    Who Am I? Coloring Book

    Who Am I? Coloring Book

    David Webb

    Who Is My Neighbor? (And Why Does He Need Me?) -- Biblical Worldview of Servanthood (What We Believe, Volume 3)

    Who Is My Neighbor? (And Why Does He Need Me?) -- Biblical Worldview of Servanthood (What We Believe, Volume 3)

    John Hay

    Who Is God? Coloring Book

    Who Is God? Coloring Book

    David Webb

    Who Is God? (And Can I Really Know Him?) -- Biblical Worldview of God and Truth (What We Believe, Volume 1)

    Who Is God? (And Can I Really Know Him?) -- Biblical Worldview of God and Truth (What We Believe, Volume 1)

    John Hay

    Who Is My Neighbor? Notebooking Journal (What We Believe)

    Who Is My Neighbor? Notebooking Journal (What We Believe)

    David Webb

    Who Is My Neighbor? Coloring Book

    Who Is My Neighbor? Coloring Book

    David Webb

    Instant Key

    • Suitable for: best for family study but might be used for independent study.
      Audience age: ages 6 -14
      Prep time needed: minimal or none
      Presentation time needed:
      moderate to high
      Religious perspective:
      Christian (Protestant)

    Publisher's Info

    • Apologia Educational Ministries

      1106 Meridian Plaza, Suite 220
      Anderson, IN 46016
      888.524.4724
      email: mailbag@apologia.com
      www.apologia.com